Dogs of the Working Group were bred to perform such jobs as guarding property, pulling sleds and performing water rescues. They have been invaluable assets to man throughout the ages. The Doberman Pinscher, Siberian Husky and Great Dane are included in this Group, to name just a few. Quick to learn, these intelligent, capable animals make solid companions. Their considerable dimensions and strength alone, however, make many working dogs unsuitable as pets for average families. And again, by virtue of their size alone, these dogs must be properly trained.

http://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/groups/working/

Akita

Whilst the original breed is originating from Japan, there are two strains of Akita -- the Japanese "Akita Inu" and the American "Akita". While in most countries they are considered different breeds, in the USA and Canada, the Akita and Akita Inu are considered one breed with separate varieties. Commonly aloof with strangers while affectionate with family members, the Akita is a powerful, independent and dominant breed. The Akita is known to be intolerant of other dogs of it's breed, as it is territorial about it's property and reserved with strangers. The Akita was never bred to work in groups, in fact the breed is known to work either alone or in opposite-sex pairs. The Akita Inu comes in a narrow palette of colours, while the Akita comes in all dog colours. With a large bear-like head, triangular ears and small, dark eyes, the Akita is a substantial spitz breed, built for cold weather. Weighing 70-130lbs, the Akita stands 24-28" at the shoulder. The Akita is prone to many health problems, including Subaceous Adenitis, Cushing's Syndrome, Addison's Disease, Hypothyroidism, Hip Dysplasia, Elbow Dysplasia and immune sensitivity to vaccines and drugs.

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Working Group
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Alaskan Malamute

Originally bred for hauling heavy freight, later for sleds, the Alaskan Malamute is a large breed. Malamutes are a strongly independent breed with a strong prey drive, while being very fond of people, making them poor watch dogs. Alaskan Malamutes have a thick, double coat that can be various shades of grey and white, black and white, red and white, seal and white, sable and white or solid white, with a wide range of markings including blazes, collar/half collar and face markings. The Alaskan Malamute weighs 75-100lbs, standing 23-25" at the shoulder. Studies have shown that the malamutes have a much longer lifespan that other breeds of their size, living up to 15 years. Health issues common in the breed include hip dysplasia, cataracts, epilepsy, congenital heart problems, kidney problems and skin problems. Cancer shows as the main cause of death in the breed.

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Working Group
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Anatolian Shepherd Dog

Originating in central Turkey, the Anatolian Shepherd Dog is rugged, large and very strong breed. Responsible for guarding flocks without human interference, the Anatolian Shepherd Dog is independent and forceful, not making a good pet unless the owner is willing to put in a lot of work and socialization. Anatolian Shepherd Dogs have been used to protect livestock that was being killed by cheetahs, as the dogs were enough of a threat for the cheetahs to leave the livestock alone and go back to their wild prey. With a broad head, thick neck and sturdy body, the Anatolian Shepherd Dog weighs 90-150lbs, and stands 27-30" at the shoulder. They can come in any colour, with white cream and "sesame" with large white patches being the most common. The breed has a very thick, double coat, leading to excessive shedding and the need to be brushed at least two times a week during warm weather. On average, the breed lives for 11 years, which is 1-2 years longer than other breeds of it's size. Common health issues include dermatologic, musculoskeletal and limpomas. The leading causes of death were cancer and cardiac, or a combination thereof. 

Group: 
Working Group
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